Daisy Hill Fiber Farm

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Sheep Feeder Photos

Most wool sheep farmers spend a lot of time trying to feed their sheep in such a manner as to avoid putting vegetable matter into their fleeces.  The search for the perfect feeder continues.  This is one that we've come up with.  It was based on a photo of someone elses that we found online.  My thought is that all good inventions have a element of simplicity in them.  This is a very simple feeder, but does a fair job of trying to direct the hay into the sheep, instead of onto the ground or into the fleece.  I know, because I've tired a mirade of other types with various levels of success.  Feel free to adopt this as your own.

Closed it keeps rain and snow out of the top of the feeder.

Open to fill.  This particular one is taller than the others - and seems to pose no problem for even the shetland to reach in.

This is a lightly filled feeder, its amazing how much hay you can pack in if you want it to last longer, or have a large number of animals.

The feeder and the coats help to keep our fleeces clean.  If you have a herbivore living on the same side as the feeder they can clean up any of the sift out that falls below the feeder.  Wire is a 5 X16' cattle pannel.  It has graduated squares that work well for this purpose.

We use the portable/temporary carports as hay storage facilities (fancy name, huh?).  Its very handy to park a feeder right outside a storage unit.  In the winter time and deeper snow its a quick dump from the shelter into the feeder.  This is Henry, being a feeder model at dawns early light.

This is what a supplied feeder looks like from the animals side.  And yes, that hay on the ground started out its career inside the feeder.  But take my word for the fact that it could be much worse.  This works as a deep bedding system for the sheep to nap or stand and eat during any type of weather.

It works well for llamas that like to lounge as they eat breakfast.  Perhaps Francis really dreams of a Lazy Boy and a TV.

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